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Tag "Sadar Bahar"

This player previews Ben & Sadar’s – We Are Righteous People (RH-STORE JAMS010). Sadar Bahar & Ben ‘Cosmic Force’ team up and come correct with these two direct disco jams!

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The two tracker accidentally arose after Sadar Bahar discovered Ben’s Utrecht based studio (housing 60 synths!). Ben was charmed by the electronic elements in Sadar’s funk and Sadar loved Ben’s ideas. Nuff said, a new NL based project was born. Nothing sampled for these tracks… only stabbing guitar, bass, sax and pounding drum programming for dance floor heat!

Tracklist
1. We Are Righteous People
2. Bouncing Atoms

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Rush Hour Weekender 2017

*Please note* Peven Everett has canceled his show on the Sunday. Therefore Sadar Bahar is joining on the Saturday!
This will make the night – now with two Chicago greats – even more nice we think! You can use your RA Sunday ticket for the Saturday, or ask for a refund before Friday the 31st of March at promotion@rushhour.nl.

After a wonderful first edition last year, Rush Hour are stoked to return with a highly promising, curious Weekender on two locations. Dream 2 Science, Hieroglyphic Being, Sadar Bahar, Vincent Floyd, Jordan Gcz and many more, are guest on the Friday and Saturday at OT301.

For this year’s edition, Rush Hour are happy to collaborate with Sounds Familiar and Red light Radio. Our friends from Sounds Familiar empower the line-up with Sadar Bahar and Patrick Gibin.

The Rush Hour Weekender started as a festivity for the opening of our current, bigger storefront. During the second edition the store turns 1 year, which will be celebrated with in-store sessions – these will be broadcasted on Red Light Radio and on Rush Hour’s online platforms. Please find more information here.

-BUY TICKETS VIA RESIDENT ADVISOR-
Click on the picture below for Friday and Saturday DAY TICKETS
PASSE-PARTOUTS are SOLD OUT

 -BUY TICKETS FOR FRIDAY AND SATURDAY AT OT 301-

Buy your DAY TICKETS for OT 301 below

ARTISTS

Dream 2 Science Live
This classic house trio will headline on the Weekender’s Friday. The New York house group’s only EP, a self-titled 12-inch from 1990, was out of print for 22 years until Rush Hour reissued it five years ago. The group will perform live for the first time in the Netherlands. Member Ben Cosmo D. was also part of the old school hip-hop group Newcleus.

Peven Everett Live
Peven Everett is undeniably one of the most prolific names in house and soul music to date. The musician closes gaps between house, r&b, jazz and hiphop. The American trumpeter is featured on jazz albums, but is also an outstanding figurehead in the Chicago house music scene.

Hieroglyphic Being Live
Jamal Moss, a.k.a. Hieroglyphic Being is an experimental composer & environmental sound artist born in Chicago, whose musical works & creations are seeded & inspired from afro-futurists concepts. The extraordinarily talented producer releases his music under many monikers, such as The Sun God, Africans With Mainframes, I.B.M and Interplanetary Prophets. His highly acclaimed Mathematics imprint releases music by the legendary Lil Louis, Steve Poindexter, next to a variety other curious and adventurous artists.

Vincent Floyd Live
The Chicago house pioneer worked with legends such as Larry Heard and Armando. Floyd released his soul drenched deep-house music on the legendary Gherkin sub-label and Dance mania imprints. Rush Hour started an artist series, re-releasing the legendary “I Dream You”, “Your Eyes” and released a collection of forgotten pearls through Floyd’s “Moonlight Fantasy” LP. A live show by the pioneer is a rare event, so we are overjoyed to have him during the Weekender.

Jordan Gcz Live
The Amsterdam based Jordan Czamanski (of Juju & Jordash and Magic Mountain High) is a major proponent of live, often improvised techno. His adventurous, lengthy live excursions are soulful, organic and futuristic. Get familiar with his (live) music through releases on his Off Minor imprint, Future Times and with his wonderful two Lushlyfe EPs.

Sadar Bahar
Disco king Sadar Bahar has been around since day one and his dreams are captured in grooves. After years and years of digging deep for records, the Chicagoan built a collection that’s too big to fit in his house. Although he has collected more records than he could possibly play, his search doesn’t stop. The King behind the decks is sanctuary…

Antal b2b Patrick Gibin
UK born DJ, producer and record collector living in Italy, Patrick Gibin aka Twice started his own record label Blend it! in 2011 with the first release of his successful and sought after Black Aroma edits series. His dj sets cover a wide range of genres, styles and tempos, from old to new sounds, all put together in an original and fresh blend. The soulful British Italian digs deeper than the obvious…

Rush Hour co-Founder Antal Heitlager prefers not to put a name to his style, the most he’ll concede is that his music is about a diversity that feels raw & spiritual. Antal has been a pretty silent force behind multiple labels and events in Amsterdam and internationally, until he outgrew to an influential DJ. When he plays out, we get a proper taste of his extraordinary vast musical knowledge and decades of experience.

Interstellar Funk
Olf van Elden alias Interstellar Funk is a young Dutch producer whose sound stands out because of its imperfections, its human warmth and its rough charm. Full of timeless melody that really makes you feel something, both his productions and his DJ sets are daring and thought provoking, always, marrying up new school sounds with the roots of house and techno, as well as dropping in the occasional new wave along the way.

KC The Funkaholic
Amsterdam’s funk father, Kees Heus aka KC the Funkaholic has been influencing the local scene since over 30 years. Never sticking to a genre, KC was the one to debute house music in Amsterdam’s legendary club RoXY in the eighties, while around the same time organizing and spinning at hip-hop parties. With Rush Hour, he started the legendary parties Disco2000/3000 in 1995. KC and Rush Hour also created the label Kindred Spirits.

Boye
Paradiso programmer and former Rush Hour coryphée’s musical knowledge is lightly put vast and extensive. He worked at Rush Hour for eight years. Good to have him back on the team during the Weekender’s Sunday evening!

Margie
As Rush Hour crewmember Margie’s Red Light Radio show implies – “Different day, different story” – she loves to surprise with her musical selection. Next to her monthly radio show, she manages Rush Hour’s House Of Music fanzine and writes about music for a variety of outlets.

Roel De Boer
Crewmember since day one, Roel de Boer has seen all in and outs of the RH company. Imagine how many releases went through his hands… Today he takes his background in house music to a whole other level. Adventurous DJ!

Mark RHD
Unassuming head of Rush Hour distribution and a variety of projects, who you might have heard playing dazzling sounds and songs under different aliases.

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Rush Hour Weekender

The Rush Hour Weekender takes place on 8-9-10 April at OT 301 and consists of a Friday and Saturday night, plus a Sunday evening (with food, like at Somewhere In Amsterdam). Tickets are available at the Rush Hour store and online via these links:

TICKETS FRIDAY (21-3h)

Dego and the 2000Black Family (live)
Volcov
Margie

TICKETS SATURDAY (22-5h)

Beau Wanzer (live)
Mick Wills
Robert Bergman
Interstellar Funk

TICKETS SUNDAY (17-1h)

Soul In The Hole
Sadar Bahar
Lee Collins (Music Box – Chicago)

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Rush Hour Weekender

We’re overexcited to present our very first weekender at our home base OT 301! Tickets are available! During this cosy 3-day festival we are celebrating the opening of our new record store with friends and artists. The new store will have a bigger playground for more new and second hand records, plus room for new activities. Dego’s 2000black Family (live), Volcov, Margie, Beau Wanzer (live), Mick Wills, Interstellar Funk, Robert Bergman, Lee Collins and Sadar Bahar are our guests.

The Rush Hour Weekender takes place at RH’s home base OT 301 and consists of a Friday and Saturday night, plus a Sunday evening (with food, like at Somewhere In Amsterdam).

TICKETS FRIDAY (21-3h)
Kicking off on Friday night in collaboration with Sounds Familiar. Dego’s 2000black band bless us with a performance, playing their unique electronic jazz and UK boogie grooves live! Long time avid music collector Volcov and Margie are joining as the cherry on top… Dancers, don’t sleep!

Dego and the 2000Black Family (live)
Volcov
Margie

TICKETS SATURDAY (22-5h)
Interstellar Funk and Robert Bergman invite Mick Wills and Beau Wanzer for an adventurous, rattling, Chicago infused Saturday night. The DJs are avid record collectors, so we’re sure to hear lots of surprises.

Beau Wanzer (live)
Mick Wills
Robert Bergman
Interstellar Funk

TICKETS SUNDAY (17-1h)
We’re very happy to have Soul In The Hole’s Sadar Bahar and Lee Collins together for the Sunday! The two veterans team up to throw more underplayed funk, jazz and soul infused disco and house music on the dancefloor. Like Sadar, Lee Collins has been one of Chicago’s musical pillars since the heydays. Sadar Bahar needs little introduction, we’re overjoyed to have him back at the decks for another great Sunday jam!!

Soul In The Hole
Sadar Bahar
Lee Collins (Music Box – Chicago)

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House Of Music - Sadar BaharAfter RH’s second House Of Music magazine, it is now time to start working on a third one. We are so pleased that disco king Sadar Bahar is coming back to Somewhere In Amsterdam to play more fantastic hidden gems from his huge record collection. Reason enough for us to share Bahar’s story that we featured in the second HOM edition.

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Theo Parrish calls him one of the best American DJs around. His record collection is as large as it is famed. And because of the ‘Soul in the Hole’ compilation he did over a year ago, Sadar Bahar made quite a few new friends. Despite of all this, the endearing American has been struggling for years. “Chicago is a gangster city. Throwing parties is a huge challenge, but I have to do it.”

If you ever witnessed a DJ-set by Sadar Bahar, you know the crowd indulges in his great vibes. That happened at a Somewhere in Amsterdam party (regularly thrown by Rush Hour), at s sold out Lowlands festival or in the dampy caves of a former train station in Rotterdam. His sets of obscure disco, boogie and shreds of gospel usually win everybody over. Many fans even compare it to a spiritual experience. A few hours of dancing to Bahar’s history lesson leaves you with a huge smile on your face, a sweaty back and many new friends. Sadar Bahar is one of those DJs who bring pure joy to people.

For Bahar joy comes in a record sleeve: vinyl. He doesn’t play anything else. CD’s don’t interest him. Memory sticks and mp3’s even less so. “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it”, he smiles. “When you’re behind your computer downloading music files you simply do not feel the same excitement as when you dig out a record.”

Treasure Hunting

Vinyl. Even Sadar Bahar’s dreams are captured in grooves. The record collection of the American DJ is so extensive; his own house is not enough to stack it all. Even his mother’s basement is filled with records. He confesses he sometimes owns as many as nine copies of a single release. “I know, even for me that’s pushing it, haha.” Wherever Bahar travels, he always pays a visit to the local record stores. Dusty old shops with boxes scattered all around are the best, he knows. “That’s where you can still find the gems “, he claims. Places where not even the owner remembers what he has in store anymore. Kneel down and wear out your jeans for hours on end, going through all those bins. It’s paradise, according to Bahar. No wonder he is looking forward to visiting the Netherlands again. “I always end up missing the record fair in Utrecht, but not this year”, he says, beaming.

Bahar has been specializing in singles lately. 7inches. He noticed the sources running dry. It’s now or never. “A while ago I drove for hours to visit a shop where I used to be a regular back in the days. When I finally arrived, a sign said ‘no disco’. Turns out the whole collection had been bought up by Japanese collectors.”

Later, when Bahar went to Japan for a show, he understood why. “Japan has some very fanatical collectors, their record stores look like ours did in the seventies.” Friends of Bahar tell him he probably owns more records than he could ever possibly play. He knows they are right, but giving up collecting is simply impossible. “It’s an addiction. Whenever I hear a super funky record I just have to have it myself.”

Frankie Knuckles

Sadar Bahar (1968) starts DJing on his thirteenth. He learns the technical tricks from DJ Charles Breckenridge, while Frankie Knuckles shows him the magic of the dancefloor. Later Bahar will play back to back with the Chicago house legend in Club Fisque. At the Music Box he meets Lee Collins, DJ and future soul mate.

Together with Collins, Bahar starts organizing dance parties in Chicago. First under the Goldmine Productions banner, later as Soul in the Hole. It turns out the name is derived from a record store in Detroit where both friends spend a considerable amount of money on a weekly basis. “We asked the owner whether we could use his name for our DJ and dance collective. He was cool with it and said: ‘I am not mixing and I am not dancing. I sell records. So go ahead’.”

Towards the end of the eighties house emerges in Chicago. Many colleagues of Bahar switch to this new and exciting genre. Sadar himself however stays true to his own style of disco, soul and boogie. “I did try it” he sighs, “but I just wasn’t feeling it. I need a drummer and a real singer who knows how to hit notes. This combined energy of a band is something that really resonates within me. My soul runs deep.”

City of Gangsters

While house music explodes everywhere around him and mutates into various different sub styles, Bahar keeps on doing his own thing. Steadily he builds up an enormous collection of disco records; buying up entire collections, and at the same time organizing his own parties. Chicago is known as the birthplace of house, but Bahar and his fellow promoters have experienced nothing but hindrance by the law. “Throwing parties is an enormous challenge. The police want everybody home at two. Twelve-to-twelve parties have become impossible. Chicago is a gangster city, you know. Everybody wants their cut, even the authorities.”

According to Bahar that’s the most important reason why clubs in the “Windy City” could never last. “The Music Box, the Warehouse and my own Kings & Queens have all been closed down within two or three years. At the same time, politicians are asking why the murder rate in Chicago is so high. People here are tense, ready to explode. So why not give them a place to release?”

Nowadays Bahar turns down most of his American booking requests. “To us it’s about the music. But often local promoters are more interested in making money”, he sighs. No wonder he prefers playing in Japan and Europe, where he has built up a dedicated network of music fans that love having him over. “There’s a lot of disco heads out there”, Bahar smiles.

He even lived in the Netherlands for a while and was determined to settle permanently. “I needed a break. Some peace of mind. In Chicago I became too distracted by side issues to be able to focus on music.”

But finding a permanent place to stay proves more difficult than he anticipated. As a foreign DJ with no steady income, getting a mortgage is too much of a challenge. These days Bahar is back in the Chicago, the city he continues to have a love-hate relationship with.

Lollipop

As a DJ, Sadar Bahar is all the way old-school. Not only because he solely plays vinyl (coming from cute briefcases filled with 7-inches), but also because he swears by the American technical set-up, that consists of a ‘lollipop’ headphone and a rotary mixer. Equipment used in legendary clubs like Paradise Garage and the Music Box that have become part of vinyl culture, according to Bahar. “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it”, Bahar repeats. And again bursts out in laughter.

Will Bahar be doing the same thing in 10 years from now we asked him? “Definitely.” Even though things like reading the small print on labels and travelling have become a bit more demanding for him these days. “Already as a kid I knew I wanted to be a DJ my entire life.” Bahar sees DJing as his calling. Someone should spread the gospel. Let it be him. “There’s so much music around that doesn’t get the appreciation it deserves. Often made by musicians that aren’t even around anymore. On top of this, on a good night I get so much back from the audience. Even though they don’t know my music, they understand what I’m trying to do.” When Bahar played in the famous Panorama bar in Berlin last year, some people left crying of joy; one person even fainted. “That gig gave me more confidence. If I can even emotionally move people in a techno club, I must be doing something right.”

Text: Rene Passet
Translation: Andrei Vilcov
Editing: Max Cole
Cover photo: Joss Kottmann

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Somewhere In Amsterdam ft. Sadar Bahar
26th of April, 2015

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This Sunday! Just a few more days until we get back together again, Somewhere In Amsterdam it is! We invited three king connoisseurs of the broad-spectrum of soul, house, disco and far beyond – Ron Trent, Sadar Bahar and Volcov – who are gonna take us on a musical trip. For the occasion we like to highlight Volcov from Verona, Italy. How do you briefly introduce a man that has been representing quality music for decades? Let’s give it a shot…

If we have to introduce Volcov, we would say that you started collecting Transmat, Dance Mania, Nu Groove in the late eighties… A few years later you lived in London and via drum and bass you got strongly attached to the West-London broken beat scene. What is your direction now?
Well yes, I started with the Larry Heard and Lil Louis adoration in ’89 – ‘91 and went on discovering more things on the way. I was into drum and bass, because I did my first productions in that style. But I got bored quickly. In the mid nineties I began my search for rare grooves, Brazilian music, soul, disco et cetera. And in the early 2000s I started making edits – I did those NYC and SJNLR series. Nowadays I try to be pretty eclectic. If I have to put it short, I think I put more attention to vocals and melodies, rather than to beats.

Back then you must have run into Ron Trent’s releases as well… These soulful grooves must have appealed to you then. How did Ron Trent inspire you in your musical life?
Ron’s production output is huge and so influential. I think I own most of Prescription and Future Vision catalogues. Although a lot of people check especially for the early-mid 90s stuff nowadays, I have to say that the USG green Prescription labels era is my favorite. I also admire the fact he started pressing vinyl again, pressing Future Vision releases when vinyl wasn’t as fashionable as it is now.

Around 2000 you got attached to the West-London broken beat scene. This particular scene kind of dried up, although the artists affiliated with that scene, like Dego, Kaidi Tatham, Mark the Clive Lowe, are still doing their thing. How did the artists after that particular West London thing continue? I reckon you are all still close friends…
I think when it became more about the beats and less about the music, it became a bit boring, a bit formulaic. Music goes often in cycles… Those names that you mention definitely kept it going, more than others. Dego and Kaidi are my favorite producers from the last decade or so, I am very partial when it comes to their music.

Sounds Familiar is a label and booking agency that represents you, Sadar Bahar and Dego to name a few. How did you get in touch with Sadar?
Sounds Familiar is actually more, it’s also a production company and in general a group of likeminded people. The first time I booked Sadar was in January 2007 for a party in Verona, and since then I contacted him regularly for gigs in various cities in Italy. Together with the JAW crew and a few other friends we tried to get him more gigs in Europe, as we were all big fans of his music and attitude. Once Ornella Cicchetti decided to come back to the music scene, it felt natural to introduce her to some friends like Dego and Sadar.

So… Somewhere In Amsterdam this Sunday… We’ve been trying to imagine what the party will be like… It will be exciting, as the musical journey can really go in different directions. Have you ever played with Ron Trent before? How do you get prepared, are you packing some secret weapons?
I never played with Ron, only had the pleasure to meet him a couple of times. But I did play few times before with Sadar and Antal, some of my favorite djs. I think the night will be quite eclectic and soulful. Not sure yet what to bring, I guess quite a mix of things, for sure that new Theo Parrish ‘Footwork’ jam… I have to say it’s quite painful that I won’t be carrying any of Ron’s tracks…

Join us at Somewhere In Amsterdam!!

RSVP and find your tickets here

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Calling out all soul, house, disco heads!!

Join us on this sunny Sunday evening in May! At Oldschool Amsterdam this time – a nice old school building. Great music and soul food … like always!

Looking forward to dancing with you all!!

More info
https://www.facebook.com/events/339664432839475/?fref=ts

Online pre-sale
http://www.rushhour.nl/store_detailed.php?item=74750

 

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