HOM | A chat with Interstellar Funk

Interstellar Funk | photo Imke Lighthart

The fourth edition of RH’s House Of Music magazine is out now. Time to share some printed content online here. Let’s start with the small article about ex-soccer player Interstellar Funk…

From the moment he first set foot in the Rush Hour office a few years ago, Olf van Elden – aka Interstellar Funk – focused his quiet energy on discovering new music. It’s the same unhurried approach Olf takes in the studio when he’s trying out different gear and musical angles. He’s got a keen, curious ear and draws from diverse inspirations which are reflected in his Rush Hour debut EP, “Electric Park Square”.

The RH crew, being his office pals, prepared a few burning questions for him. The type of questions, that we usually save for after hours.

You’ve bought and sold quite a bit of studio gear on your search for your favorite machines. Which piece of musical equipment was your worst friend?

Six years ago, when I didn’t know much about gear, I agreed to trade my MS10 for a Moog Prodigy with some guy from Antwerp. We met in front of a museum in the middle of the night and swapped synths. Back then, I only had a Juno 60 and I was looking for a good mono­synth. I got rid of the MS10, because although I think it’s cool for additional use, I just didn’t use it as my ‘main’ synth.

Actually… I was looking for a Sequential Circuits Pro One instead of the Prodigy. The Pro One is one of the most beautiful mono synths around. It has a super strong, clean sound and is pretty easy to explore. It’s that kind of synth which you can use in every track. But… they’re hardly available and pretty expensive. Checking out the web, the Prodigy looked like a good alternative. It wasn’t until I got home that I discovered the machine didn’t have a midi or CV/gate. My loss. Two weeks later I sold it again and got the Pro One in return.

Which piece of musical equipment will you never get rid of?
I recently bought a Yamaha CS30 and it’s insane. It has several trigger options and it also offers a step sequencer, which you can modify into crazy weird sounds.

How did you come up with Interstellar Funk as your artist name?
I was about to release my first 12″ but didn’t have a name back then. I stole it from an old Detroit electro track because I liked the vibe of it.

You are not the first ex­soccer player in the RH team with a pro­career in sight. Can you introduce Interstellar Funk the soccer player in a nutshell?
I think I was 16 years old when I really wanted to become a professional soccer player. I did quite well and ended up playing at a professional level in Oss (Noord­-Brabant, NL) for one year. I really enjoyed the experience, but didn’t have time left for anything else. After one year, the club went bankrupt and I returned to Arnhem, my hometown. I kept playing soccer until my brother and I moved to Utrecht.

How did you end up in music?
I went to my first festival with my older brother when I was about 15 years old. Back then, he already threw parties at places like Club 11, Trouw’s predecessor. That was the first club I went out to on a regular basis. When we moved to Utrecht, I started to discover the world of record shops. At 20, I moved to Amsterdam together with my brother. That’s when I got familiar with Rush Hour. It was at the same time Dekmantel started throwing their first events.

How is soccer represented in the RH team for you?
Not that much. We are more into dodgeball lately…

photo: Imke Lighthart

HOUSE OF MUSIC (H.O.M. 4)
Free copies are available at your fave record store or online, at rushhour.nl

Rush Hour House Of Music