Somewhere In Amsterdam ft. Ron Trent, Sadar Bahar, Antal and …Volcov!

This Sunday! Just a few more days until we get back together again, Somewhere In Amsterdam it is! We invited three king connoisseurs of the broad-spectrum of soul, house, disco and far beyond – Ron Trent, Sadar Bahar and Volcov – who are gonna take us on a musical trip. For the occasion we like to highlight Volcov from Verona, Italy. How do you briefly introduce a man that has been representing quality music for decades? Let’s give it a shot…

If we have to introduce Volcov, we would say that you started collecting Transmat, Dance Mania, Nu Groove in the late eighties… A few years later you lived in London and via drum and bass you got strongly attached to the West-London broken beat scene. What is your direction now?
Well yes, I started with the Larry Heard and Lil Louis adoration in ’89 – ‘91 and went on discovering more things on the way. I was into drum and bass, because I did my first productions in that style. But I got bored quickly. In the mid nineties I began my search for rare grooves, Brazilian music, soul, disco et cetera. And in the early 2000s I started making edits – I did those NYC and SJNLR series. Nowadays I try to be pretty eclectic. If I have to put it short, I think I put more attention to vocals and melodies, rather than to beats.

Back then you must have run into Ron Trent’s releases as well… These soulful grooves must have appealed to you then. How did Ron Trent inspire you in your musical life?
Ron’s production output is huge and so influential. I think I own most of Prescription and Future Vision catalogues. Although a lot of people check especially for the early-mid 90s stuff nowadays, I have to say that the USG green Prescription labels era is my favorite. I also admire the fact he started pressing vinyl again, pressing Future Vision releases when vinyl wasn’t as fashionable as it is now.

Around 2000 you got attached to the West-London broken beat scene. This particular scene kind of dried up, although the artists affiliated with that scene, like Dego, Kaidi Tatham, Mark the Clive Lowe, are still doing their thing. How did the artists after that particular West London thing continue? I reckon you are all still close friends…
I think when it became more about the beats and less about the music, it became a bit boring, a bit formulaic. Music goes often in cycles… Those names that you mention definitely kept it going, more than others. Dego and Kaidi are my favorite producers from the last decade or so, I am very partial when it comes to their music.

Sounds Familiar is a label and booking agency that represents you, Sadar Bahar and Dego to name a few. How did you get in touch with Sadar?
Sounds Familiar is actually more, it’s also a production company and in general a group of likeminded people. The first time I booked Sadar was in January 2007 for a party in Verona, and since then I contacted him regularly for gigs in various cities in Italy. Together with the JAW crew and a few other friends we tried to get him more gigs in Europe, as we were all big fans of his music and attitude. Once Ornella Cicchetti decided to come back to the music scene, it felt natural to introduce her to some friends like Dego and Sadar.

So… Somewhere In Amsterdam this Sunday… We’ve been trying to imagine what the party will be like… It will be exciting, as the musical journey can really go in different directions. Have you ever played with Ron Trent before? How do you get prepared, are you packing some secret weapons?
I never played with Ron, only had the pleasure to meet him a couple of times. But I did play few times before with Sadar and Antal, some of my favorite djs. I think the night will be quite eclectic and soulful. Not sure yet what to bring, I guess quite a mix of things, for sure that new Theo Parrish ‘Footwork’ jam… I have to say it’s quite painful that I won’t be carrying any of Ron’s tracks…

Join us at Somewhere In Amsterdam!!

RSVP and find your tickets here